Jurassic Finds 2 Year Anniversary: A look back on fossil discoveries, volunteering, research and studying.

In this article I give an overview of some of the articles and palaeontological outreach I have been involved in over the past two years on the 2nd year anniversary of the Jurassic Finds blog.

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Thoughts on the palaeontological fieldwork taking place in the Jurassic Mile, Wyoming June 2019.

On the 25th March 2019 a new joint palaeontological fieldwork expedition was announced. This fieldwork will see palaeontologists from the Natural History Museum London, The University of Manchester, The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis and the Naturalis Biodiversity Centre in the Netherlands work together in the Badlands of Wyoming USA to discover new Jurassic dinosaur remains in addition to other animal remains from 150 million years go.

This article will share my thoughts on this fieldwork project, which will be starting this coming June and why Wyoming remains my number one dinosaur field site locality to visit.

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Ichthyosaur Blubber Discovery: Evidence that these Marine Reptiles were Warm-Blooded!

On the 5th of December 2018 new research was published by palaeontologists in the Journal of Nature about the analysis of blubber tissue in a preserved specimen of the Early Jurassic ichthyosaur Stenopterygius. This article will examine this fossil discovery and why it is important evidence for warm bloodedness in ichthyosaurs. Continue reading “Ichthyosaur Blubber Discovery: Evidence that these Marine Reptiles were Warm-Blooded!”

Macrocollum itaquii: An Insight Into Sauropodomorph Evolution

On the 21st of November 2018 new research was published in the Journal of The Royal Society about the discovery of a new species of dinosaur named Macrocollum itaquii. In this article I examine this dinosaur discovery and what it means for understanding early dinosaur evolution during the Triassic era.

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Dinosaurs Galore: The Dinosaur Exhibits of London’s Natural History Museum

After what must be over 18 years I visited the Natural History Museum in London yesterday. In this article I give my laid back review of what I saw, what dinosaur exhibits I thought were brilliant and those that I felt could be improved upon further.

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Discovery of new juvenile Diplodocid skull in Montana raises more questions than answers about sauropod development

On the 11th of October 2018 research was published in the Journal of Scientific Reports about a wonderful discovery, a relatively rare find of a skull from a juvenile diplodocid. This article will examine this fossil discovery and what it means for understanding young sauropod development.

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Historically Significant Palaeontological Images: My Top 5

In this article I examine a National Geographic article by science writer John Pickrell focusing on the mystery and beauty of dinosaurs. Thinking about the importance of palaeontological imagery, I break down my Top 5 Palaeontological images that I see as historically significant.

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Palaeontology & Me: 5 questions answered exploring my interest in Palaeontology

For this article I figured I would do something a little bit different. I thought I would share more about my interest in Palaeontology by answering 5 questions about what it means to me.

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New Triassic Pterosaur discovery Caelestiventus hanseni changes what we thought we knew of pterosaur evolution

On the 13th of August 2018 a new palaeontological discovery was announced in the Journal of Nature Ecology & Evolution. This discovery was of a new species of pterosaur called Caelestiventus hanseni its name meaning “heavenly wind”, it lived during the Triassic 210 million years ago, predating known pterosaur relatives by 65 million years. This article will discuss this incredible fossil discovery. Examining where it was found, the analysis that took place and what this fossil means for understanding pterosaur evolution.

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