Ichthyosaur Blubber Discovery: Evidence that these Marine Reptiles were Warm-Blooded!

On the 5th of December 2018 new research was published by palaeontologists in the Journal of Nature about the analysis of blubber tissue in a preserved specimen of the Early Jurassic ichthyosaur Stenopterygius. This article will examine this fossil discovery and why it is important evidence for warm bloodedness in ichthyosaurs. Continue reading “Ichthyosaur Blubber Discovery: Evidence that these Marine Reptiles were Warm-Blooded!”

Macrocollum itaquii: An Insight Into Sauropodomorph Evolution

On the 21st of November 2018 new research was published in the Journal of The Royal Society about the discovery of a new species of dinosaur named Macrocollum itaquii. In this article I examine this dinosaur discovery and what it means for understanding early dinosaur evolution during the Triassic era.

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Dinosaurs Galore: The Dinosaur Exhibits of London’s Natural History Museum

After what must be over 18 years I visited the Natural History Museum in London yesterday. In this article I give my laid back review of what I saw, what dinosaur exhibits I thought were brilliant and those that I felt could be improved upon further.

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Discovery of new juvenile Diplodocid skull in Montana raises more questions than answers about sauropod development

On the 11th of October 2018 research was published in the Journal of Scientific Reports about a wonderful discovery, a relatively rare find of a skull from a juvenile diplodocid. This article will examine this fossil discovery and what it means for understanding young sauropod development.

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Historically Significant Palaeontological Images: My Top 5

In this article I examine a National Geographic article by science writer John Pickrell focusing on the mystery and beauty of Dinosaurs. Thinking about the importance of Palaeontological imagery, I break down my Top 5 Palaeontological images that I see as historically significant.

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Palaeontology & Me: 5 questions answered exploring my interest in Palaeontology

For this article I figured I would do something a little bit different. I thought I would share more about my interest in Palaeontology by answering 5 questions about what it means to me.

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New Triassic Pterosaur discovery Caelestiventus hanseni changes what we thought we knew of pterosaur evolution

On the 13th of August 2018 a new Palaeontological discovery was announced in the Journal of Nature Ecology & Evolution. This discovery was of a new species of pterosaur called Caelestiventus hanseni its name meaning “heavenly wind”, it lived during the Triassic 210 million years ago, predating known pterosaur relatives by 65 million years. This article will discuss this incredible fossil discovery. Examining where it was found, the analysis that took place and what this fossil means for understanding pterosaur evolution.

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New Chinese Sauropod Lingwulong shenqi shocks Palaeontologists

On the 24th of July 2018 new research was published by Palaeontologists in the Journal of Nature Communications about the amazing discovery of a new Sauropod from China a Diplodocoid called Lingwulong shenqi its name meaning “amazing dragon of Lingwu.” This article will examine this fossil discovery, the research that has taken place and what it means for Palaeontological understanding of the evolution of Sauropods.

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Isle of Skye Dinosaur Footprints sheds light on Scotland’s Jurassic Past.

On the 2nd of April 2018 research was published by Palaeontologists from the University of Edinburgh, Staffin Museum and the Chinese Academy of Sciences in the Scottish Journal of Geology. This research focused on the discovery and analysis of Sauropod and Theropod Dinosaur fossil footprints from the Mid Jurassic found in the Lealt Shale Formation at Rubha nam Brathairean (Brothers’ Point) on the Isle of Skye. This article will examine this discovery, the research that took place and what was found.

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