Isle of Skye Dinosaur Footprints sheds light on Scotland’s Jurassic Past.

On the 2nd of April 2018 research was published by Palaeontologists from the University of Edinburgh, Staffin Museum and the Chinese Academy of Sciences in the Scottish Journal of Geology. This research focused on the discovery and analysis of Sauropod and Theropod Dinosaur fossil footprints from the Mid Jurassic found in the Lealt Shale Formation at Rubha nam Brathairean (Brothers’ Point) on the Isle of Skye. This article will examine this discovery, the research that took place and what was found.

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Enantiornithes Chick Fossil: An insight into Prehistoric Avian Development

On the 5th of March 2018 avian fossil research led by Dr Fabien Knoll from the University of Manchester’s Interdisciplinary Centre for Ancient Life (ICAL) was published in the journal of Nature Communications. This research focused on the fossil discovery of a very young Enantiornithes, a prehistoric group of bird from the Early Cretaceous. This article will explain more about this discovery and its importance for understanding ancient avian development.

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Dinosaur Locomotion: Running with Dinosaurs

On the 21st of February research was published in the Journal of PLOS One about a new study on the influence of ground dwelling Birds speed and size on locomotion (walking & running) to help gain an understanding as to how Theropod Dinosaurs might have moved. 12 species of bird were recorded on specially built running tracks by researchers in Australia with computer models extrapolating the data. This article will examine this research and what it could mean for the future of Paleontology.

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The Dinosaur Extinction: Where Marine Lava Flowed

On the 8th of February research was published in the Journal of Science Advances about the K-T event (Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event which killed the Dinosaurs). The research presented evidence for the global magmatism (activation of Magma around the world) as a result of the Chicxulub Meteorite impact. This article will examine this study and what it means for Paleontology.

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Mansourasaurus shahinae: The Egyptian Discovery

On the 29th of January a new species of sauropod Mansourasaurus shahinae was announced to have been discovered by Palaeontologists in the Egyptian Desert. A surprising fossil find as North Africa is not well known for major Dinosaur discoveries, this article will examine this fascinating Dinosaur discovery and what the implications of this fossil find are for Palaeontologists in the North of Africa.

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Jurassic Finds hits a major January milestone 1,000 views! Thank You!

Jurassic Finds has hit a major milestone with over 1,000 views! An amazing achievement. Here in this article James shares his Thank You and what his hopes for the blogs development are over the coming year.

I just wanted to briefly write a quick article of Thanks to say ‘Thank You’ to those of you who have been interested enough to read Jurassic Finds and to follow the fossil discoveries I have covered this January. It has been a fantastic experience for me not only to share my passion for Dinosaurs and Fossils with you all but to help share the latest Paleontological discoveries through this blog.

I started this blog to inspire others and the reception I have received from people who have read the articles so far has been incredibly positive. Please by all means share this blog and its articles with fellow scientists, Palaeontologists, friends and family, anyone who is interested in Dinosaurs, Fossils and Palaeontology! I did not expect to reach 1,000 views so quickly so a massive ‘Thank You’ for your support and continued interest. Hopefully this mile stone will be beaten again in the near future! My hopes for this blog  is to continue to expand, sharing and inspiring others to find out more about the latest Dinosaur discoveries around the world.

I will be getting to work on my fifth article this week, so keep an eye on Jurassic Finds for when it drops!

May amazing Fossil Discoveries long continue!

James

New Brightly Feathered Dinosaur Caihong juji shimmered like a Hummingbird

On the 15th of January Palaeontologists in China published an article in the Journal of Nature Communications about the discovery of a new Jurassic Dinosaur called Caihong juji. This new 161 million year old Theropod was covered in iridescent feathers and plumage on its head, wings and tail similar to that of today’s hummingbirds. This article will look at this new fossil discovery, examining why its feathers are special and why Caihong is such an unusual Dinosaur.

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New Ornithischian Dinosaur Diluvicursor pickeringi identified in Victoria, Australia

Scientists in Victoria, Australia have identified a new ornithischian (bird-hipped) Dinosaur called Diluvicursor pickeringi. First discovered in 2005 and from the Early Cretaceous it has recently been identified as a new Dinosaur. This article will explore more about this new find and what could be expected of future discoveries in the region. Continue reading “New Ornithischian Dinosaur Diluvicursor pickeringi identified in Victoria, Australia”